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Ovasitol & Your Fertility {EXPERT FERTILITY ADVICE}

In this video I was joined my Dr. Mark Ratner, founder and Chief Science Officer of Theralogix, to talk about the benefits of inositols for your fertility. We answered all your burning questions.

Comment below with your thoughts!

Order Ovasitol (and other Theralogix supplements referenced in the live) here: aimeeraupp.com/ovasitol

See all of my recommended supplement brands here: https://aimeeraupp.com/aimees-recommended-fertility-supplements-optin/ 

PLEASE SEE BELOW FOR FULL TRANSCRIPT OR CLICK IMAGE FOR VIDEO

Aimee Raupp:

We are here to talk about one of my favorite products that I recommend on a regular basis to many of my women who are trying to conceive, regardless if they have PCOS or not. It is called Ovasitol. It is made by a company, Theralogix. And I have the honor today of bringing on Dr. Ratner from Theralogix to discuss all the pros and cons… I shouldn't even say cons. All the benefits of Ovasitol and who it's good for and I know there was some really good questions on the post and I'm going to address all of those, I promise. Let's see. I'll wait for Theralogix to request to join me live and then we will get to it. But I myself have some questions and was also just reading some research on the effects of Ovasitol… Sorry. Inositol, the Myo-Inositol, D-chiro-Inositol, on the impacts of women with PCOS.

Aimee Raupp:

There's a great review study that came out in, let's see, 2016 in the International Journal of Endocrinology, and what it showed after looking at literally over a dozen different studies of women with PCOS, 12 randomized controlled studies they looked at, they found … Oh, here we go. Theralogix sent me a request to join live. But I just want to show you. In conclusion, the analysis of these clinical trials highlight the salutary effects of Myo-Inositol supplementation on improving several of the hormonal and reproductive disturbances of PCOS. Furthermore, the analysis lends prominence to the pivotal role of Inositol, mainly Myo and D-chiro, as a safe and effective therapy for PCOS including enhanced [oo 00:02:13] site follicular development, [oo 00:02:15] site maturation, and stimulation and pregnancy outcomes. Amazing.

Aimee Raupp:

So let's bring on Dr. Ratner. Let's do this. Some questions, have a conversation. Let's see, that's working. I hit the accept. Okay. I'm hitting the… There we go. Oh, pretty view. Looks like you live near me. Where do you live?

Dr. Ratner:

Hey.

Aimee Raupp:

Hi.

Dr. Ratner:

For some reason-

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

It's using the back camera. Can you hear me?

Aimee Raupp:

I can hear you. Do you want to go to the other side or it won't flip? It won't-

Dr. Ratner:

No, you know what I'll do? I'll just turn the phone around.

Aimee Raupp:

Oh, brilliant. That works. It's a nice view, though. Where are you?

Dr. Ratner:

I'm in Maryland. Can you see me?

Aimee Raupp:

Okay. I can, I can. Hello. Nice to meet you. Let's see. He froze for a sec.

Aimee Raupp:

Huh? Okay, you're back. You froze for a second. Let's see. I don't know why you're freezing. All right. There you are.

Dr. Ratner:

Can you see me?

Aimee Raupp:

I can see you.

Dr. Ratner:

Okay.

Aimee Raupp:

You are here.

Dr. Ratner:

All right.

Aimee Raupp:

How are you today? Good?

Dr. Ratner:

I'm good. I'm good. Thank you.

Aimee Raupp:

That's good. That's good. So tell us a little bit about yourself. You're at Theralogix. What's your role there?

Dr. Ratner:

Yeah. I am a physician.

Aimee Raupp:

Okay.

Dr. Ratner:

I'm essentially the founder and currently the chief science officer of Theralogix.

Aimee Raupp:

That's amazing. It's an amazing company. Congrats.

Dr. Ratner:

Yeah. We've been around for about 20 years now and I no longer see patients in practice. I stopped about a couple years ago, but before then I primarily treated male fertility patients and I worked with one of the largest fertility practices in the country.

Aimee Raupp:

Which one?

Dr. Ratner:

I've got a fairly extensive knowledge of fertility, perhaps a little bit more on the male side than the female side from practical experience. But in my role at Theralogix I've had a tremendous exposure to the published literature about [inaudible 00:04:47] and PCOS, and we first launched our product like five or six years ago. We struggled with what we like to call NIH syndrome, which means-

Aimee Raupp:

I've seen the research at one point. I know exactly the syndrome.

Dr. Ratner:

It stands for Not Invented Here.

Aimee Raupp:

[Laughing 00:05:11].

Dr. Ratner:

We had a lot of very blank looks from many of the doctors that we deal with when we would start sharing the published literature about inositols.

Aimee Raupp:

Right, and it's effects.

Dr. Ratner:

Because that literature even five, six years ago, was already pretty substantial and it's even grown bigger and better now. And so I think, inositols have finally really become pretty widely understood in the States and much more widely accepted by clinicians, and I think the PCOS community has really been, in many ways, responsible for that.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah. So I guess going to that point, do you think inositol is just for PCOS demographic or do you think it extends, because I know there's some research about equality improvement and IVF?

Dr. Ratner:

Yeah, yeah. That's a great question. There was a pretty big study that was published, looking at an inositol supplementation in women who were, basically, poor responders. In other words, they did not have PCOS, but they just had what appeared to be diminished ovarian reserve and poor response to a previous IVF cycle.

Aimee Raupp:

Right.

Dr. Ratner:

And this was a placebo control study and women who were treated with inositol did significantly better.

Aimee Raupp:

And the same ratio, like the 2000 milligrams, the 40:1, Myo, D-chiro?

Dr. Ratner:

Yeah. Yeah. I mean the interesting thing is that most of the studies, I would say probably about 90% of the published studies, have used a 4,000 milligram dose per day.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah, that's high.

Dr. Ratner:

2000 milligrams, or two grams, of the powder, twice per day.

Aimee Raupp:

Right.

Dr. Ratner:

And much of the original research done using pure Myo-inositol.

Aimee Raupp:

Right.

Dr. Ratner:

But it's been now realized that the body's normal ratio between these two different forms of inositol, Myo-inositol and D-chiro-inositol, the body's normal ratio is 40:1.

Aimee Raupp:

Right.

Dr. Ratner:

And it's been shown that if you supplement with a 40:1 ratio of those two, it does a better job of restoring the body's normal ratio.

Aimee Raupp:

Right, and so how does the body's normal ratio get compromised, if you will?

Dr. Ratner:

Ah. Well, this starts to get complicated.

Aimee Raupp:

Okay.

Dr. Ratner:

And if I get too far out in the deep end of the pool, drag me back. Yeah.

Aimee Raupp:

[crosstalk 00:08:11] Yeah. I'll pull your wrists, yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

So it turns out that Myo-inositol is the form that is in 99% of the inositol in our tissues are in the form of Myo.

Aimee Raupp:

Okay.

Dr. Ratner:

And both Myo-inositol and D-chiro-inositol are second messengers for the insulin receptor.

Aimee Raupp:

Right.

Dr. Ratner:

When insulin binds to the receptor on surface of a cell, in order for it to have its effect-

Aimee Raupp:

Right, get brought in and be utilized. You need the data… Right.

Dr. Ratner:

For sugar to come into the cell, for the cell to be able to burn the sugar for energy, or perhaps store it as glycogen for later use. In order for that to happen, the insulin receptor has to release second messengers into the cell.

Aimee Raupp:

Okay.

Dr. Ratner:

And the second messengers then sort of give the cell instructions so to speak. And it turns out that the two different inositols comprise the bulk of those second messengers. And the ratio between Myo and D-chiro varies from one tissue to the next. Now, because most of the inositol is in the Myo form, what happens is there's actually an enzyme, it's called an epimerase enzyme, which we have in our tissues, it's in our cells, and its job is to convert Myo-inositol into D-chiro-inositol.

Aimee Raupp:

Gotcha. Okay.

Dr. Ratner:

And what happens when somebody has insulin resistance…

Aimee Raupp:

They don't have that enzyme.

Dr. Ratner:

…in PCOS is in their peripheral tissues.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

Which means fat muscle, the liver actually, the epimerase enzyme is deficient. It doesn't work properly. And so they, they are deficient in the conversion. They don't convert Myo into D-chiro enough in the peripheral tissues. But then…

Aimee Raupp:

It's almost like MTHFR where you're missing that ability to take folic acid into methyl-folic. Right. Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

Why that epimerase enzyme malfunctions in PCOS is still not really understood.

Aimee Raupp:

Right.

Dr. Ratner:

But the paradox, the thing that makes it so unusual, is that in the ovary the epimerase… Even in women with PCOS, in the ovary the epimerase enzyme works fine. And so what happens in the ovary is actually you get too much production, too much conversion of Myo and [inaudible 00:10:50].

Aimee Raupp:

[crosstalk 00:10:50] Wow, and that's why. Got you.

Dr. Ratner:

So in the peripheral tissues, you don't have enough D-chiro, and you have arguably too much Myo. And in the ovary, you've got too much conversion, so you've got less Myo and too much D-chiro. So they call that the ovarian paradox.

Aimee Raupp:

Right.

Dr. Ratner:

Which is why too much D-chiro… One of the original studies that was done with inositols in women with PCOS used pure D-chiro inositol as the intervention. What they found was, as they increased the dose, the daily dose of D-chiro, ovarian function got worse and worse and worse. The reason was because the ovary is really deficient in Myo.

Aimee Raupp:

Gotcha. So you need both. Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

But the peripheral tissues need a little bit of D-chiro to reduce the insulin resistance in those tissues.

Aimee Raupp:

And so this delivery in your powder form of that ratio helps with both, basically?

Dr. Ratner:

Exactly. That's the rationale for it. And there are studies which show that the correction of the metabolic abnormalities, reduction in insulin levels, lowering testosterone levels, those metabolic abnormalities do better with the combined supplementation than with Myo alone.

Aimee Raupp:

So that's important for everybody to know, that even if they're not going to get your product, which I think your product is the best one out there and has the most research, but that you can't just use the Myo. You need the Myo and the D-chiro in that exact ratio of the 40:1.

Dr. Ratner:

Absolutely.

Aimee Raupp:

And then, so how does it help women that don't have PCOS? Is it that there is some level of insulin resistance that's starting, or blood sugar abnormalities that are impacting hormones and there's something like that going on?

Dr. Ratner:

So it turns out that the inositols-

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

Function as second messengers for other hormone receptors besides the insulin receptor.

Aimee Raupp:

[crosstalk 00:13:08] Makes sense. Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

And the two others that we know that the best evidence exists for are the thyroid, the thyroid stimulating hormone, that is essentially using myo-inositol also as its second messenger, but the other one is FSH, follicle stimulating hormone. And so the theory behind why it improves egg quality is that it's improving the ability of FSH to stimulate follicle growth.

Aimee Raupp:

Right.

Dr. Ratner:

And so the inositol-

Aimee Raupp:

And then there's some concern in the community. I hear this a lot with my clients, “But I heard that Myo-inositol diminishes AMH in women with high AMH that have PCOS. Will it diminish my low AMH?” I usually talk them off that ledge, in a sense of it's more about improving ovarian function and the output of the eggs from the ovaries, but I don't know if you can explain that at all or if you see evidence wise on that?

Dr. Ratner:

I think I'm going to have to plea… Keep in mind my board certification is in urology and so I treat male fertility. And so when I start drifting into a direction of female reproductive endocrinology, that's when I'm out in the deep end of the pool.

Aimee Raupp:

[crosstalk 00:14:42] Okay. Nope, so maybe I'm pushing you too much. Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

And so, honestly, I don't really have a great answer for you on that.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah. I still think, though, in general, what we're seeing is… And it makes sense. Whether they have insulin resistant PCOS or non-insulin resistant, or they're just dealing with fertility challenges, knowing that the Myo-inositol secondarily impacts thyroid function and FSH, then I think that's where we're finding the improvement in egg quality, right?

Dr. Ratner:

Absolutely. Yeah.

Aimee Raupp:

And I also think, to the AMH question, the way it works in my brain, which I'm not as deep in the research as you are, is just that those numbers don't matter so much. They change month to month, things of that nature. They don't necessarily represent… We don't know for a fact, but as far as we can tell, they have nothing to do with quality. And so what we're really trying to do is improve the quality of the functioning of the cells and the Myo and the D-chiro, that ratio helps to improve that. So I would almost just look at it as not so worrisome what it does to your numbers, your AMH or FSH, but more that we're focused on quality. That's what we care about. We want a quality embryo.

Dr. Ratner:

Absolutely. Yeah. And again, as I mentioned earlier, there are studies which show that for women who are poor responders, many of whom presumably, either have low antral follicle counts or AMH-

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah, low AMH, I'm sure. Yeah, and high FSH. Right.

Dr. Ratner:

They do better with inositol supplementation.

Aimee Raupp:

At that same dose? At the 2000, twice a day? At that same dose?

Dr. Ratner:

Oh, yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Put it this way, we know that dose is totally safe.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

And there are actually studies out there that have looked at inositols for things like depression which use doses up to like 16 grams per day. The dose is safe. And four grams per day is generally very well tolerated. Two grams in the morning, two grams in the evening, just dissolved in water, there is going to be maybe a small percentage of people who get a little bit of GI upset. They can get some loose stool from that almost like a lactose-type of intolerance, but not that common. The powder is tasteless and odorless, so it's pretty well tolerable. Interestingly, when we launched Ovasitol our product, which is now almost six years ago, we were the only 40:1 product ever available in the United States.

Aimee Raupp:

[crosstalk 00:17:26] Wow. I remember that. I feel like I remember that.

Dr. Ratner:

And now if you go to Amazon, there's lots of them.

Aimee Raupp:

What separates you guys besides the research and the clinical trials?

Dr. Ratner:

So there's a couple of things… Well, look, the point here is that using inositols and… If you have PCOS and you want to see whether you can get some benefit from inositol supplementation, the absolute minimum amount of time you'll need to take it is about three months.

Aimee Raupp:

Right. Okay.

Dr. Ratner:

And for most of the metabolic studies looking at things like testosterone and skin and hair issues, you really need about six months of supplementation to see significant benefit for those end points. And so, we sell Ovasitol in a three month supply.

Aimee Raupp:

Right.

Dr. Ratner:

The rationale for that is that's really [inaudible 00:18:28]. There's no doctors taking it for a shorter period of time than that because you're not going to see the benefit you're hoping for.

Aimee Raupp:

Right.

Dr. Ratner:

And the other thing is we sell it as a full four grams per day and there's a lot of other products that are out there and I forget what our product costs, it might cost $70 or something in that range, for a 90 day supply. But there are a lot of products there that if you go to Amazon, it'll say 40:1, $19.95. And when you look hard, it turns out they'll say 30 days supply. But it turns out they're only giving you two grams or 2000 milligrams.

Aimee Raupp:

2000, that's right. 2000. It's not 4,000. Right.

Dr. Ratner:

And you don't bother just buying 30 days. I mean, if you want to try and see if this is going to help, you need to do at least 90.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah, and I like how yours comes. I love the packets for the jar with the scooper. I think it's very easy. Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

If you do an apples to apples comparison, we're clearly the least expensive of product out there, but we're also the only one that's independently content certified.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

And that's an important distinction, especially for women who are in sort of a reproductive timeframe. You want to know exactly what you're putting into your body.

Aimee Raupp:

Yes.

Dr. Ratner:

And in the supplement world, that's not, unfortunately, it's not always a given. Our products go through a certification process through an independent nonprofit agency called NSF. NSF used to be part of the University of Michigan. It's now a freestanding nonprofit up in Ann Arbor.

Aimee Raupp:

Right.

Dr. Ratner:

And so that certification, basically, assures our customers what you're getting is exactly what you think you're getting.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

And there's no contaminants or adulterants and it's sort of content certified. So that's an important-

Aimee Raupp:

Which is super important, yeah. That's one thing I always stress with. So many supplements out there have unnecessary fillers, or binders, things of that nature, that are no good for us or our fertility. I have another question. Metformin in conjunction with… Because a lot of PCOS girls are put on Metformin. I've also seen I believe there's some smaller research studies showing Ovacitol can have similar effects to Metformin. Do you have thoughts or comments on that?

Dr. Ratner:

Sure. I want to be careful because we're, we're not supposed to equate-

Aimee Raupp:

No, we can't. You're right.

Dr. Ratner:

A supplement with a prescription medication and certainly anybody who is taking Metformin now and doing well on it, I would never encourage them to stop taking Metformin.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah, always at the advice of your physician, guys. Always. Yeah, yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

Absolutely, absolutely. But I will tell you that in head-to-head studies, and there's several of them that have now been published, in head-to-head studies not only looking at metabolic endpoints, things like insulin sensitivity or insulin levels, 24 hour area under the curve results on insulin, Metformin and inositol supplementation are essentially equivalent if you use the proper dose. The only real significant difference between the two in most of the studies is that Metformin has four to five times the risk of discontinuation because of side effects.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

So, inositols are generally very well tolerated. They're safe. There's actually even a couple of studies showing that if you combine the two, Metformin and inositol, it's actually better than Metformin alone.

Aimee Raupp:

See, that's good to know because sometimes I was hesitant of my girls that are on Metformin, is it overkill to also put them on the inositol. So that's very good to know.

Dr. Ratner:

Yeah. One other thing I'll mention, and that is women with PCOS when they do get pregnant, they have a 300% increase risk of gestational diabetes. And there are now about a half dozen studies that have shown inositol supplementation for women with PCOS, if you continue it during pregnancy, it cuts your risk of gestational diabetes in half.

Aimee Raupp:

Amazing.

Dr. Ratner:

So it's certainly not only safe to continue during pregnancy, but-

Aimee Raupp:

Highly beneficial.

Dr. Ratner:

Yeah.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah. I mean, because also gestation diabetes does a number on their body, but that also can really impact the child too, right? Wow, that's amazing information. Okay.

Aimee Raupp:

We have it listed on my site, I believe too, the way I'm set up with you guys, you guys will get a discount if you order it through my site. I don't know if I have a link. I don't know, Beth, if you have the link you can post it or you guys can DM us. And so then I think the other thing, too, to really point out is it's not just for PCOS. Most of the studies are around PCOS but then there is good information out there showing it helps improve egg quality, as well, even in women who are poor responders. So to me, it's kind of like a no-brainer across the board that it's something that should be a part of everybody's fertility regimen.

Dr. Ratner:

Yeah. For women who are going through IVF…

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

I worked with one of the largest IVF practices in the country for many years, so I kind of know how the IVF docs think. They love their technology.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah. I know. They love it. They love their success, too.

Dr. Ratner:

Exactly. No, you're exactly right. They love their technology because they know how successful it can be. But it's been very clearly shown that women with PCOS, when they go through IVF, they have a much higher risk of something called ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

Aimee Raupp:

[crosstalk 00:24:47] Yeah, yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

And there was a study published in the past 12 months showing that if you're doing IVF and you have PCOS, staying on inositols dramatically reduces your risk of OHSS, of hyper stimulation syndrome, which is an even more serious potential risks of IVF.

Aimee Raupp:

Oh, yeah. I've had women lose ovaries from that. I mean, just it's super uncomfortable hospitalizations to get fluid drained. It can be a significant issue. So much so, that always my PCOS girls, I kind of prep them leading into a transfer. This is what you're going to do exactly after this is how you prevent OHSS. Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

And the REIs have a tendency to… Well, like we said, it's because it works, in most instances, in a very predictable way.

Aimee Raupp:

[crosstalk 00:25:43] Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

They kind of feel like IVF is the answer and the cure all for anything that's going on, including PCOS. “We'll get you pregnant, don't worry.” But the point is that some of these adjunctive steps, things like certain supplements like inositols, like Coenzyme Q10s-

Aimee Raupp:

You guys have a great CoQ10. I recommend that one all the time. The Neo Q10, yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

That [inaudible 00:26:14] for PCOS patients. But for women who have egg quality issues, CoQ10 is certainly a good supplement to add in. But there's still a tendency that… We know reproductive endocrinologists, IVF docs from all over the country, and more and more of them are acknowledging the benefits of using these supplements in a complimentary way. It's not all or nothing. It's not like either you just take a very natural approach with supplements or you do the IVF.

Aimee Raupp:

[crosstalk 00:26:50] Yeah, or do both.

Dr. Ratner:

Yeah, exactly. They're now seeing the benefits of doing both.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah. I see it too. I've been in the field now for almost 20 years. In the beginning, the stuff I would recommend was poo-pooed or kind of ignored. I remember one doctor saying to a patient like, “Diet and supplements have nothing to do with fertility.” At a very well established clinic in New York city. I will not name names. Now most of them have nutritionists on staff, they have supplements. A lot of them love your products. Theralogix is a very common one I see recommended.

Dr. Ratner:

Five, six years ago, we would talk to a lot of fertility practices about vitamin D supplementation. All of our prenatals contained a ton of vitamin D, 2000 to 3000 units per day.

Aimee Raupp:

And choline. You have some good choline in your prenatal, too, which I appreciate greatly.

Dr. Ratner:

Six years ago, we got so many shrugged shoulders and blank looks about vitamin D, and now, I would say in virtually every fertility practice in the country, it's part of the screening blood work.

Aimee Raupp:

It is. It is.

Dr. Ratner:

They want to make sure that if you're going to go through an IVF or IUI cycle, your 25-OHD is above 30. They want get the [inaudible 00:28:14].

Aimee Raupp:

Well, and they see, too, it improves AMH. Your D's higher, your AMH is better. Which is interesting. There's a direct correlation. And that's because vitamin D is not a vitamin, it's a hormone. And it's a pro steroid hormone. It helps all your other hormones in your body, guys. Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

It's funny, that's a line I've been using for 10 years. Yeah.

Aimee Raupp:

Really?

Dr. Ratner:

What's the definition of a vitamin? The definition of a vitamin is a compound that we have to get from our food that's essential for our metabolism. And what definition of a hormone? A hormone is a substance that's made in one part of the body and functions in others.

Aimee Raupp:

Another part, yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

Yeah, and so vitamin D fits the definition of a hormone. It's not a vitamin. There's almost no good food sources for vitamin D. People think-

Aimee Raupp:

No, none. Yeah.

Dr. Ratner:

Right? No, you get vitamin D and milk because the milk manufacturers have to put it there. They have to add it.

Aimee Raupp:

And it's typically soy based and crappy vitamin D anyway or it's in a soy oil.

Dr. Ratner:

The point is that vitamin D, you're absolutely right, it's a hormone. It's not a vitamin.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah, yeah. This has been great. Someone else just asked a question now. If they're on Metformin, do they still take the regular dose, the 4,000 or the four grams? Do you recommend still the same dose?

Dr. Ratner:

I think so. I'm not aware of any reports of people becoming hypoglycemic.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah, that's what I was going to say. I mean, if you're on Metformin and you have PCOS that's insulin resistance, it's probably smart to be checking your sugars. You could even do one of those glucose monitors and you could go and see. But I've never seen that either. I've only seen what you're saying.

Dr. Ratner:

There are no reports of excess insulin sensitivity in the literature. I think it's safe, yeah.

Aimee Raupp:

And if anything, insulin's just so critical to all of us, whether they have PCOS or not. And so much of what I do, even diet and lifestyle, is just balancing blood sugar because it balances hormones. We see that, we know it, we, we feel it, we see it in our cycles changing. So adding something like Ovasitol to your fertility regimen, to me, is a super smart thing to do. And then I did just get… You guys get $10 off if you order it through me. It's Amieeraupp.com/ovasitol. O-V-A-S-I-T-O-L. And yeah, maybe we have you back on and we'll talk about some of your other products. Because I like your prenatal, it's great. Your Conception XR, your Neo Q10, right? That's what it's called? Neo Q10? Isn't that what it's called?

Dr. Ratner:

Yeah. Neo Q10, it's a Coenzyme Q10 product and what makes it sort of unique is solubilization.

Aimee Raupp:

Yes.

Dr. Ratner:

CoQ10 is extremely difficult to absorb from your stomach. One of the things that people always say, “What's the best dose? How much CoQ10 should I be taking if I'm 38 and I'm trying to conceive?” And the answer is that it's not what you ingest, it's what you absorb. And so the form that the CoQ10 is delivered in is really important. And Neo Q10 is basically the CoQ10 formulated with an emulsification agent that about quadruples the absorption compared to standard CoQ10.

Aimee Raupp:

[crosstalk 00:31:35] Yeah. So you need less, right? You need 200? Or what do you recommend?

Dr. Ratner:

So a lot of women may have heard this 600 milligram number and the 600 milligram number on CoQ10 comes from one of the first studies that was ever done by a Dr. Bob Casper up in Toronto who dosed women with 600 milligrams of an oil based Coenzyme Q10. Oil based products typically have a 2% to 4% range. The point is our product, which has anywhere from three to six times the absorption of that type of oil based product, we suggest about 250 milligrams in that.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah. Yeah. That's what I like about yours is you can get more bang for your buck, basically.

Dr. Ratner:

Yeah.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah, yeah. You're getting less. And I've also seen two high doses of CoQ10 make women really jittery and anxious. I don't know if you've heard anything about that, but it's very stemming it seems like. Okay, this is great. So any last things you want to say to this audience?

Dr. Ratner:

No, thank you. It's been great talking to you. If we talk again, next time I'll make sure that my forward facing [inaudible 00:32:49].

Aimee Raupp:

[crosstalk 00:32:48] You were great, you were great. It's Instagram. Super casual.

Dr. Ratner:

I've been looking at the back of my phone for the-

Aimee Raupp:

Can't even see your face, I know. That's okay. You did great, it's awesome. And so yeah, guys. Aimeeraupp.com/ovasitol. O-V-A-S-I-T-O-L. And you get $10 off. And like Dr. Ratner said, three months minimum, I think, to really see the impacts on things, and that you are taking the full dose of the 2000 milligrams twice a day.

Dr. Ratner:

Right.

Aimee Raupp:

Yeah. All right. Thank you, and you guys check out Theralogix. They have great products across the board and super backed by science, which obviously is very respectable and trustworthy. So thank you.

Dr. Ratner:

Thanks again. Bye-bye.

Aimee Raupp:

Goodbye.

END TRANSCRIPT

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